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Do you sleep better alone?

Do you sleep better alone? Tips on getting a good night's sleep while sharing a bed with a partner

The company of another body in your bed can be comforting. You can cuddle, there is extra warmth and you may have that feeling of security as you fall asleep. But are you getting a good night's sleep with someone else in your bed? You may be disturbed by snoring, a restless sleeper, someone with night terrors, sleep walking/talking, cover hogs or just the lack of adequate space in your bed.

According to a study from The National Sleep Foundation, 61% of Americans share their bed with a significant other, noting intimacy and comfort as top reasons. But if you find yourself unable to sleep due to your partner’s snoring, restlessness or other bedtime habits, read these tips for how you can get a better night's sleep with your partner.

Use the bed for sleep and sex only.

If one of you likes to watch TV before bed, and the other needs darkness and quiet, consider having a few minutes of in-bed snuggle time then separate so that person staying up can continue those activities in another room.

Resolve any conflicts.

Give attention to your partner at night and go to bed happy and content (i.e. not after a fight). This can lead to a more peaceful and complete night's sleep. Your state of mind can go a long way when it comes to getting a good night's sleep. Take the time to resolve any conflicts with your partner before you hit the sack and keep the communication open.

Find a snoring solution.

According to The National Sleep Foundation, 41% of Americans agreed that a partner snoring was a major impact on achieving a good night's sleep.

If your partner snores, try:

  • SleepPhones. This is a simple and effective solution for those who have trouble falling asleep because of a snoring partner. The soft headphones with speakers block out noise and allow you to listen to soothing sounds and music that will put you right to sleep.
  • Encouraging your partner to use a pillow to prop up his/her neck or back to reduce snoring. You can even build your own anti-snoring pillow by putting a tennis ball in the middle of a pillow, so your partner can't sleep comfortably on his or her back. Sleeping flat on the back tends to result in the loudest snoring.
  • Spooning! Laying on your side in a fetal like position may decrease the sound and chances of snoring.

Pay attention to your partner's sleep habits.

MSN Health suggests that if your partner is waking up throughout the night or has trouble staying asleep and becomes restless, pay attention to what he/she is doing before bed. One of the reasons they may be moving around throughout the night and keeping you up could be because a) had caffeine or alcohol before bed, b) the physical environment in which they sleep (like the mattress) may not be comfortable, or c) their mind is still stimulated from TV or other distracting things in the bedroom. Try reminding him or her about avoiding and breaking those habits so that you can both sleep more peacefully.

Commit to a pre-bedtime wind-down routine together.

Use this time to talk or read together. Treat one another to a back rub or write in a journal. Check out the 5 winding down tips for a better night's sleep blog for more ideas. Be sure to keep a consistent bedtime to reinforce the body and mind to sleep.

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